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2018 Spring Challenge

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Sangre de Cristo (Spanish for "Blood of...
by Jim Bob Swafford
Category: Wet Medium
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Contest is finished!
https://www.westernartrodeoassociation.com/2018-spring-challenge/?contest=photo-detail&photo_id=7124
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Title:
Sangre de Cristo (Spanish for "Blood of...

Author:
Jim Bob Swafford

Category:
Wet Medium

Description:
Caprock Canyons State Park is one of my favorite places to visit. The red canyon walls have served me well in many landscape paintings. The earlier explorers called the place Sangre de Cristo (Spanish for "Blood of Christ") Painting 18" x 24" oil canvas - open to consider selling. The canyon red walls and wide prairies have served the Comanches, Kiowas, and other nomadic tribes in their hunt for bison. Even prior to that, evidence shows that prehistoric tribes sought shelter and hunted small game in the rocks. Coronado apparently visited the canyon and its environs in 1541 or thereabouts, commenting that the area that would become Texas was eerie, with seas of grass that could swallow one whole, and punctuated with violent weather. The Comancheros held sway here, trading with the Comanches for weapons, pots, and other modern accoutrements.
Description:
Caprock Canyons State Park is one of my favorite places to visit. The red canyon walls have served me well in many landscape paintings. The earlier explorers called the place Sangre de Cristo (Spanish for "Blood of Christ") Painting 18" x 24" oil canvas - open to consider selling. The canyon red walls and wide prairies have served the Comanches, Kiowas, and other nomadic tribes in their hunt for bison. Even prior to that, evidence shows that prehistoric tribes sought shelter and hunted small game in the rocks. Coronado apparently visited the canyon and its environs in 1541 or thereabouts, commenting that the area that would become Texas was eerie, with seas of grass that could swallow one whole, and punctuated with violent weather. The Comancheros held sway here, trading with the Comanches for weapons, pots, and other modern accoutrements.
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